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Appalachian Studies

Broad studies, academic programs, bibliographies

Abramson, Rudy, and Jean Haskell, ed.  2006.  Encyclopedia of Appalachia.  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.  1832 pp.  Weatherford Award winner for nonfiction. Thirty subject divisions; 2000 signed entries; 1000 writers (indexed);  Table of Contents: Foreword / William Ferris -- An appreciation / Henry Louis Gates Jr. -- Guide for readers -- Introduction -- The landscape: Geology; Ecology; Environment -- The people: Family and community; Images and icons; Race, ethnicity, and identity; Settlement and migration; Urban Appalachian experience -- Work and the economy: Agriculture; Business, industry, and technology; Labor; Tourism; Transportation -- Cultural traditions: Architecture; Crafts; Folklore and folklife; Food and cooking; Humor; Language; Literature; Music; Performing arts; Religion; Sports and recreation; Visual arts -- Institutions: Cultural institutions; Education; Government; Health; Media.

Abramson, Rudy, and Jean Haskell, ed.  2006.  “Introduction.”  In Encyclopedia of Appalachia, ed. R. Abramson and J. Haskell, ixx-xxvii.  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.

Alexander, J. Trent, and Chad Berry.  2010.  “Who Is Appalachian?: Self-Reported Appalachian Ancestry in the 2000 Census.”  Appalachian Journal 38, no. 1 (Fall): 46-54.  Migrant identity; tables.

Anglin, Mary K.  2010.  “Moving Forward: Gender and Globalization in/of Appalachian Studies.”  Appalachian Journal 37, no. 3-4 (Spring/Summer): 268-285.

Appalachia by the Numbers [new column, last page of each issue].  2007.  Appalachian Journal 34, no. 2 (Winter): 272.  List of ironic statistics in the spirit of Harper’s Magazine’s monthly “Harper’s Index.”

Appalachian High.  2010.  Special issue, Now & Then: The Appalachian Magazine 26, no. 1 (Summer): 1-72.  “This issue...explores various interpretations...associated with the word ‘high,’ from...prescription drug abuse...to the adrenaline rush of jumping off a bridge in West Virginia...from raptor flight high overhead to...sugar ‘high’ after swigging a Mountain Dew.”

Appalachian Journal Index, 1991-1996.  1996.  Special issue, Appalachian Journal 23 (Summer): 352-479.

Appalachian Journal Index, 1996-2001.  2001.  Special issue, Appalachian Journal 28 (Summer): 408-519.

Appalachian Journal Roundtable Discussion: A Conversation About Teaching Appalachian Studies.  2002.  Introduction and Reflections by Sandra Hayslette & Chad Berry. “‘We’re All Appalachian’” by Mark Banker; “The Power of Stories” by Steve Fisher; “The Culture and the Classroom” by Roberta Herrin; “Appalachian Literature and Senior Learners” by Marianne Worthington; “The Education of a Sociologist of Appalachia” by Susan H. Ambler; “Hillbilly Trinkets and Doodads” by Grace Toney Edwards; “Faith in Ourselves, Faith in Our Future” by Stephen D. Mooney.  Appalachian Journal 29 (Summer): 416-441.

Appalachian Museums & Archives.  2000.  Special issue, Now & Then: The Appalachian Magazine 17 (Winter): 1-40.

Appalachian Rivers, Lakes & Streams: A Region’s Life Reflected in its Waters.  2001. Special issue, Now & Then: The Appalachian Magazine 18 (Spring): 1-44.

Baehr, Theodore, Jr., Mark V. Wetherington, and Michael Toomey, compilers.  2004.  “A Topical Bibliography of Articles from The East Tennessee Historical Society’s Publications 1-61 (1929-1989) and The Journal of East Tennessee History 62-74 (1990-2002).”  Journal of East Tennessee History 75 (2003): 91-112.

Ballard, Sandra, and Edwin T. Arnold, ed.  2002.  “A Festschrift Featuring Works Presented at a Symposium in Honor of J. W. Williamson, Editor of the Appalachian Journal, 1972-2000” [retiring, founding editor].  Appalachian Journal 29 (Fall 2001-Winter 2002): 1-272.

Ballard, Sandra L., ed.  2007.  “A Special Issue on Appalachian Activism in Honor of Stephen L. Fisher.”  Appalachian Journal 34, no. 2 (Winter): 276-464.  Essays, poetry, interview, and the following Activist Stories essays: “Plant Both Annuals and Perennials” by Nina Gregg and Doug Gamble -- “Buying, Eating, and Acting Locally” by Chad Berry -- “Separate Paths Lead to Just Connections” by Susan Ambler and Kathie Shiba -- “Peaks and Valleys” by Guy & Candie Carawan -- “Active Living” by Loyal Jones -- “Appalachian Stepchild to Child of Appalachia” by Bill Best -- “Letter to the Carnegie Foundation” by Richard A. Couto --  “The Class of ’74: Appalachian Teachers’ Workshop, Berea College” by Grace Toney Edwards -- “Crossing the Campus-Community Divide: New Trends in Research Collaboration” by Phil Obermiller -- “Scholars and Activists in Cincinnati” by Michael E. Maloney -- “Inspiring Transformative Community-Based Learning” by Gordon B. McKinney -- “Living an Inspired Life: Teaching Social Activism” by Theresa L. Burriss -- “Common Causes” by Jeff Boyer -- “Thinking Back on Fighting Back” by Fran Ansley -- “Teaching and Community Work in Appalachia” by Chris Baker -- “Feminist Praxis” by Mary K. Anglin -- “Connecting the Academy and the Community” by Dwight B. Billings -- “Road Work” by Herb Reid -- “Reflections on Struggle” by Elizabeth C. Fine -- “The Work Poetry Can Do” by Diane Gilliam -- “The Mountaineer Queer Ponders His Risk-List” by Jeff Mann -- “Inspiration” by John Hennen -- “On Discovering Teachers: An Escape From the Classroom” by George Loveland -- “Chainsaw Activism; Or, a Chainsaw as an Activist’s Tool” by Jim Minick -- “Serendipity and Strip Mining” by Chad Montrie -- “Getting Ready to Learn” by Guy Larry Osborne --  and “We’re All Activists” by Melinda Bollar Wagner.

Banker, Mark T.  2010.  Appalachians All: East Tennesseans and the Elusive History of an American Region.  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.  328 pp.  “Appalachians All intertwines the histories of three communities—Knoxville with its urban life, Cades Cove with its farming, logging, and tourism legacies, and the Clearfork Valley with its coal production—to tell a larger story of East Tennessee and its inhabitants.”

Barney, Sandra.  1997.  “Coming to Terms with Northern Appalachia” [Pa.].  Now & Then: The Appalachian Magazine 14 (Winter): 8-10.

Beaver, Patricia D.  2010.  “An Appalachian Odyssey: Interview with Patricia D. Beaver,” by Bruce E. Stewart.  Appalachian Journal 37, no. 3-4 (Spring/Summer): 164-182, including selected bibliography of her books and articles, 181-182.  Beaver (b. 1948) became the first director of the Center for Appalachian Studies, in 1979, at Appalachian State University.

Berry, Chad.  2000.  “Upon What Will I Hang My Hat in the Future? Appalachia and Awaiting Post-Postmodernity” [directions for scholarship].  Journal of Appalachian Studies 6 no. 1-2 (Spring/Fall): 121-130.

Best, Bill, comp, ed.  [1997] 2000.  One Hundred Years of Appalachian Visions, 1897-1996.  2nd ed.  Berea, Ky.: Appalachian Imprints.  233 pp.  Selected essays, articles, and poems of 57 writers reflecting on Appalachian identity.

Best, Bill.  [1973] 1999.  From Existence to Essence: A Conceptual and Mythological Model for an Appalachian Studies Curriculum.  Berea, Ky.: Appalachian Imprints.  148 pp.  Reprints the author’s Ed.D. thesis, University of Massachusetts, plus results of a 1966 follow-up study.

Best, Bill.  2011.  “Remembering the First Appalachian Studies Conference, October 1970.”  Now & Then: The Appalachian Magazine 27, no. 1 (Summer): 54-57.  Clinch Valley College, Wise, Va., sponsored by the Council of the Southern Mountains, planned by Bill Best.  Plus Project Torchlight, Upward Bound, Appalachian Volunteers, and evolution of – and resistance to – Appalachian Studies at Berea College and locally.

Bial, Raymond.  1997.  Mist Over the Mountains: Appalachia and Its People [children’s  literature; photographs].  Boston: Houghton Mifflin.  48 pp.

Biggers, Jeff.  2006.  The United States of Appalachia: How Southern Mountaineers Brought Independence, Culture, and Enlightenment to America. New York: Shoemaker & Hoard.  238 pp.  Chapters: Rank strangers | The trail of words | The first Washington, D.C. | Down from the mountain | The emancipators | All the news that’s fit to print | The great American industrial saga | We shall overcome.

Billings, Dwight B., Mary Beth Pudup, and Altina Waller.  1995. “Taking Exception with Exceptionalism: The Emergence and Transformation of Historical Studies of Appalachia.”  In  Appalachia in the Making: The Mountain South in the Nineteenth Century, ed. M. Pudup, D. Billings, and A. Waller, 1-24.  Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.

Billings, Dwight B., Chad Berry, and John C. Inscoe.  2002.  “Three Responses to Larry Griffin and Ashley Thompson” [“Appalachia and the South: Collective Memory, Identity, and Representation.” Appalachian Journal 29 (Spring): 296-327]: “Insularity, Advocacy, and Postmodernism in Appalachian Studies” by Dwight B. Billings;  “Looking for Common Ground” by Chad Berry;  and “Encouraging Cross-Pollination” by John C. Inscoe.  Appalachian Journal 29 (Spring): 328-340.

Billings, Dwight.  2003.  “Practicing Sociology in Appalachia: Interview with Dwight Billings.”   Interview by Caroline E. Knight, Sarah Poteete, Amy Sparrow, and Jessica C. Wrye.  Appalachian Journal 30 (Winter-Spring): 164-180.

Billings, Dwight B.  2004.  “Appalachia.”  In Poverty in the United States: An Encyclopedia of History, Politics, and Policy, ed. G. Mink, and A. O’Connor, 93-97.  Santa Barbara, Calif.: ABC-CLIO.

Billings, Dwight B.  2007.  “Appalachian Studies and the Sociology of Appalachia.”  Chap. 44 in  21st Century Sociology: A Reference Handbook, Vol. 2,  ed. C. Bryant and D. Peck, 390-396 -- bibliographic references, 543-546.  Thousand Oaks, Calif.: Sage.

Billings, Dwight.  2009.  “Writing Appalachia: Old Ways, New Ways, and WVU Ways.”  Introduction in Culture, Class, and Politics in Modern Appalachia: Essays in Honor of Ronald L. Lewis, ed. J. Egolf, K. Fones-Wolf, and L. Martin, 1-28.  Morgantown: West Virginia University Press.  Paper first given as keynote lecture at 2007 WVU conference, “Transforming Appalachian Scholarship.”

Birdsall, Stephen S., and others, ed.  2009.  “Appalachia and the Ozarks” [textbook overview].  Chap. 8.  In Regional Landscapes of the United States and Canada, 7th ed., 145-163.  Hoboken, N.J.: J. Wiley.  Maps, tables, review questions.

Blaustein, Richard.  1998.  Review essay of One Hundred Years of Appalachian Visions, 1897-1996, by Bill Best (Berea, Ky.: Appalachian Imprints, 1997).  Appalachian Journal 25 (Winter): 186-196.

Bolgiano, Chris.  2011.  “On Becoming Appalachian” [op-ed essay].  Appalachian Journal 38, no. 2-3 (Winter/Spring): 164-168.  “...can someone who is not from this region become Appalachian?”

Brodsky, Marc, and Gene Hyde.  2012.  “Surviving the Downturn: Challenges Faced by Appalachian Regional Collections during a Time of Reduced Resources.”  Journal of Archival Organization 10, no. 3-4 (July): 165-190.  Interviews with directors of 13 archival repositories at state universities and private colleges in the Appalachian region.

Bronner, Simon J.  2006.  Encyclopedia of American Folklife.  4 vols.  Armonk, N.Y.: M.E. Sharpe.  350 entries including the following: Allegheny Region -- Appalachia -- Banjo -- Baptists, Old Regular -- Barns -- Baskets and Basketry -- Blue Ridge -- Bluegrass Music -- Cincinatti -- Cockfighting -- Death and Funerals -- Ethnic and Immigrant Folklife -- Family -- Folk Art -- Folk Festivals -- Folk Music and Song -- Folk Society -- Folk Speech and Language -- Folklife and Folk Culture -- Folklife Organizations -- Folklore -- Folklorists -- Foodways -- Gay Communities -- Gospel Music -- Gravemarkers -- Healing and Medicine -- Healing, Faith -- Hillbilly -- Humor -- Hunting -- Ku Klux Klan -- Landscape -- Legends -- Lumbering -- Lutherans -- Märchen -- Medicine, Folk -- Memorial Day -- Miners, Anthracite -- Miners, Bituminous -- Northern Appalachian Region -- Old-Time Music -- Oral and Folk History -- Ozarks – Pennsylvania Culture Region -- Pentecostals -- Pittsburgh -- Pottery – Prisoners   -- Psychobilly -- Public Folklife -- Quilting -- Railroaders -- Region -- Religion -- Rugs and Rug Making -- Scottish Communities -- Shakers -- Shenandoah Valley Region -- Snake Handling Sects -- Southeastern Indians -- Steelworkers -- Storytelling -- Unions -- Urban Folklife -- Women -- Wood.

Brown, Jo. B., comp.  1995.  “Annual Bibliography, 1994.”  Journal of Appalachian Studies 1 (Fall): 121-134.

Brown, Jo. B., comp.  1996.  “Annual Bibliography, 1995.”  Journal of Appalachian Studies 2 (Spring): 159-177.

Brown, Jo. B., comp.  1997.  “Annual Bibliography, 1996.”  Journal of Appalachian Studies 3 (Spring): 99-122.

Brown, Jo. B., comp.  1998.  “Annual Bibliography, 1997.”  Journal of Appalachian Studies 4 (Spring): 115-152.

Brown, Jo. B., comp.  1999.  “Annual Bibliography, 1998.”  Journal of Appalachian Studies 5 (Spring): 77-113.

Brown, Jo. B., comp.  2000.  “Annual Bibliography, 1999.”  Journal of Appalachian Studies 6 no. 1-2 (Spring/Fall): 172-208.

Brown, Jo. B., comp.  2001.  “Annual Bibliography, 2000.”  Journal of Appalachian Studies 7 (Spring): 104-143.

Brown, Jo. B., comp.  2002.  “Annual Bibliography, 2001.”  Journal of Appalachian Studies 8 (Spring): 168-213.

Brown, Jo. B., comp.  2003.  “Annual Bibliography, 2002.”  Journal of Appalachian Studies 9 (Spring): 147-215.

Brown, Jo. B., comp.  2004.  “Annual Bibliography, 2003.”  Journal of Appalachian Studies 10 (Spring/Fall): 167-200.

Brown, Jo. B., comp.  2005.  “Annual Bibliography, 2004.”  Journal of Appalachian Studies 11, no. 1-2 (Spring-Fall): 243-278.

Brown, Jo. B., comp.  2007.  “Annual Bibliography, 2005.”  Journal of Appalachian Studies 13, no. 1-2 (Spring-Fall): 167-210.

Brown, Jo. B., comp.  2007.  “Annual Bibliography, 2006.”  Journal of Appalachian Studies 13, no. 1-2 (Spring-Fall): 211-254.

Brown, Jo. B., comp.  2008.  “Annual Bibliography, 2007.”  Journal of Appalachian Studies 14, no. 1-2 (Spring-Fall): 174-218.

Brown, Jo. B., comp.  2009.  “Annual Bibliography, 2008.”  Journal of Appalachian Studies 15, no. 1-2 (Spring-Fall): 155-194.

Brown, Jo. B., comp.  2010.  “Annual Bibliography, 2009.”  Journal of Appalachian Studies 16, no. 1-2 (Spring-Fall): 156-199.

Brown, Jo. B., comp.  2011.  “Annual Bibliography, 2010.”  Journal of Appalachian Studies 17, no. 1-2 (Spring-Fall): 214-256.

Brown, Jo. B., comp.  2012.  “Annual Bibliography, 2011.”  Journal of Appalachian Studies 18, no. 1-2 (Spring-Fall): 244-300.

Brown, Logan, Theresa Burchett-Anderson, Donavan Cain, and Jinny Turman Deal, with Howard Dorgan.  2003.  “Where Have We Been? Where Are We Going? A History of the Appalachian Studies Association”  [with responses by Richard B. Drake, 86-87; Howard Dorgan, 88-90; Phillip J. Obermiller, 90-92].  Appalachian Journal 31 (Fall): 30-92.

Bryant, Ron D., comp.  2000.  Kentucky History: An Annotated Bibliography.  Bibliographies of the States of the United States, no. 9.  Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press.  553 pp.

Burch, John R., comp.  2009.  The Bibliography of Appalachia: More Than 4,700 Books, Articles, Monographs and Dissertations, Topically Arranged and Indexed.  Contributions to Southern Appalachian Studies, no. 25.  Jefferson, N.C.: McFarland.  222 pp.  Divided into twenty-four topical areas, with separate author and subject indexes.

Burriss, Theresa L., and Steven Salaita.  2008.  “Q&A: Appalachian Inside and Out.”  Pluck: The Journal of Affrilachian Arts & Culture, no. 3: 24-30.  East Tennessean Burris and Virginian (child of Middle Eastern parents) Salaita discuss cultural identity.

Campbell, John C.  [1921, 1969] 2004.  The Southern Highlander & His Homeland [seminal cultural study].  Foreword by Rupert B. Vance; Introduction by Henry D. Shapiro.  Reprint.  Lexington: University Press of Kentucky.  405 pp.  Originally published: New York: Russell Sage Foundation.  405 pp.

Campbell, Olive Dame.  2012.  Appalachian Travels: The Diary of Olive Dame Campbell [1882-1954].  Edited by Elizabeth McCutchen Williams.  Lexington: University Press of Kentucky.  294 pp.  “In 1908 and 1909, noted social reformer and ‘songcatcher’ Olive Dame Campbell traveled with her husband, John C. Campbell [author of The Southern Highlander and His Homeland (1921)],  through the Southern Highlands region of Appalachia to survey the social and economic conditions....Appalachian Travels offers an invaluable account of mountain society at the turn of the twentieth century.”  Contents: October 1908: Virginia, Tennessee, North Carolina, Georgia | November 1908: Tennessee and Kentucky | December 1908: Kentucky | January 1909: Kentucky and Tennessee | February 1909: Tennessee | March 1909: North Carolina | Appendix: Publications by Olive Dame Campbell | Glossary.

Celebrating Appalachian Institutions.  2006.  Special issue, Now & Then: The Appalachian Magazine 22, no. 2 (Fall/Winter): 1-72.

Center for Appalachian Studies and Services: Celebrating 20 Years.  2003.  Now & Then: The Appalachian Magazine 20, no. 2-3 (Summer/Winter): 38-56.  Essays in tribute to ETSU’s CASS in this possibly final issue of the Center’s journal, by Ted Olson, Arthur H. DeRosier Jr., Richard Blaustein, Patricia Beaver, Jack Higgs, Jean Haskell, Phil Leonard, Christina Tortora and Judy B. Bernstein, Kathleen Curtis Wilson, Richard M. Kesner, Norma Myers, Jackson A. Berea, Jill Oxendine, Thomas G. Burton, Margaret A. Mackay, and Jack Tottle.

Center for Virtual Appalachia [website].  2001.  Provided by The Institute for Regional Analysis and Public Policy, Morehead State University, Morehead, Ky.  Extensive website includes search engine, maps, news, and six major headers: Overview of Appalachia; People and Culture; Data Sources; Landscape and Environment; Appalachia on the Web; Explore the CVA Site.  http://cva.morehead-st.edu/index.html.

Chase, Nan K.  2007.  Asheville: A History [N.C.].  Contributions to Southern Appalachian Studies, no. 19.  Jefferson, N.C.: McFarland.  281 pp.

Commemorating 30 Years of Service to the People of Appalachia.  1995.  Special issue, Appalachia: Journal of the Appalachian Regional Commission  28 (Winter/Spring): 1-80.

Conner, Tiffani R.  2009.  “Building and Maintaining a Statewide Digital Library.”  Journal of East Tennessee History 81: 58-66.  Digitized primary source material from Tenn. archives searchable by topic, era, county, and institution.  http://www.volunteervoices.org/.

Conway, Cecelia.  2002.  “Appalachia” [definition, overview].  In The Companion to Southern Literature: Themes, Genres, Places, People, Movements, and Motifs, ed. J. Flora and L. Mackethan, 39-43.  Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press.

Cooper, Christopher A., H. Gibbs Knotts, and Katy L. Elders.  2011.  “A Geography of Appalachian Identity.”  Southeastern Geographer 51, no. 3 (Fall): 457-472.  Map, tables.  “Our measure...is based on the relative number of businesses in a city that include the word ‘Appalachian’ in their name....We also...determine that poverty level, percent Black, elevation, and population density,” are predictors.

Cooper, Christopher, Gibbs Knotts, and Don Livingston.  2010.  “Appalachian Identity and Policy Opinions” [“Many...in Appalachia do not identify with the region”].  Journal of Appalachian Studies 16, no. 1-2 (Spring-Fall): 26-41.  Appalachian identifiers are older, have lived in the region a larger portion of their lives, are more highly educated, and their identity “is strongly related to opinions on growth and development policies.”  Tables, charts, and appendix (survey questions).

Copely, Rich.  2010.  “‘The Grandfather of Appalachian Studies’ Receives Honor” [Loyal Jones].  Lexington Herald-Leader, 24 October.  1,264 words.  “Retired Berea College professor...Loyal Jones will receive the Governor’s Awards in the Arts Folklife Heritage Award this week.”

http://www.kentucky.com/entertainment/music-news-reviews/article44056725.html/.

Cunningham, Rodger.  1996.  “Post the Lost Past: Malcolm Chapman’s The Celts: The Construction of a Myth” [St. Martin’s Press, 1992; review essay].  Journal of Appalachian Studies 2 (Fall): 263-276.

Cunningham, Rodger.  2003.  “Appalachian Studies among the Posts” [modernism, structuralism, colonialism; 25 years of Appalachian Studies began with Henry Shapiro’s Appalachia on Our Mind (1978)].  Journal of Appalachian Studies 9 (Fall): 377-386.

Dickinson, W. Calvin, and Eloise R. Hitchcock, ed.  1999.  A Bibliography of Tennessee History, 1973-1996.  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.  453 pp.  Arranged by county and historical period.

Digital Library of Appalachia.  2007.  The DLA database includes photographs, manuscripts, diaries, letters, articles, music and oral history recordings drawn from library special collections of the Appalachian College Association, a consortium of 35 small, private, liberal arts colleges in the Central Appalachia Region.  http://www.aca-dla.org/.

Dirlik, Arif.  2002.  “Civic Scholarship: Comments on ‘Appalachia As a Global Region: Toward Critical Regionalism and Civic Professionalism’” [by Herbert Reid and Betsy Taylor, Journal of Appalachian Studies 8 (Spring 2002): 9-32].  Journal of Appalachian Studies 8 (Spring 2002): 33-41.

Drake, Richard B.  2000.  “Appalachian Notes and Appalachian Studies: A Memoir” [quarterly journal, 1973-1985].  Appalachian Heritage 28 (Fall): 19-23.

Drake, Richard B.  2000.  “Early Interpreters of Appalachian Culture” [Who’s who list of scholars].  Appalachian Heritage 28 (Winter): 5-7.

Drake, Richard B.  2001.  A History of Appalachia.  Lexington: University Press of Kentucky.  304 pp.  Comprehensive history.

Drake, Richard.  1996.  Reviews of Appalachia in the Making: The Mountain South in the Nineteenth Century, ed. M. Pudup, D. Billings, and A. Waller (University of North Carolina Press, 1995), and The First Frontier: Transition to Capitalism in Southern Appalachia, by Wilma A. Dunaway (University of North Carolina Press, 1996).  Appalachian Heritage 24 (Summer): 54-62.

Dunaway, Wilma.  2004.  “Revisionist With a Cause: Interview With Wilma Dunaway.”  By Erin Casto, Sara E. Harris, Eddie Huffman, Melanie Keyes, Sharon Price, and Paul Robertson, with Patricia Beaver.  Appalachian Journal 31 (Winter): 166-191.

e-WV: The West Virginia Encyclopedia [2000 articles online].  2010.  Charleston: West Virginia Humanities Council.  Based on the West Virginia Encyclopedia (2006); includes tabs for Browse by Category, Index A-Z, Events, Exhibits, Features, See WV, plus video and audio clips, interactive maps, and a 12,000-item time line.  http://www.wvencyclopedia.org/.

Edgar, Walter B., ed.  2006.  The South Carolina Encyclopedia [1,927 entries by 598 contributors].  A Project of the Humanities Council SC.  Columbia, S.C.: University of South Carolina Press.  1077 pp.

Edwards, Grace Toney, JoAnn Aust Asbury, and Ricky L. Cox, ed.  2006.  A Handbook to Appalachia: An Introduction to the Region.  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.  296 pp.  Primer; 12 separately-authored chapters, each with “Suggested Readings” list: History, People, Natural Resources, Economics, Politics, Health Care, Education, Folklife, Literature, Religion, Visual Arts, Appalachians Outside the Region.

Eller, Ronald D.  2004.  “Night Comes to the Cumberlands: A Biography of a Depressed Area, Harry Monroe Caudill” [1963 landmark study].  In Poverty in the United States: An Encyclopedia of History, Politics, and Policy, ed. G. Mink, and A. O’Connor, 507-508.  Santa Barbara, Calif.: ABC-CLIO.

Engaging Appalachia [theme].  2012.  Special issue, Prism: A Journal of Regional Engagement, vol. 1, no. 1 (Spring): 1-79.  Edited by Joe Gershtenson; published by Eastern Kentucky University Libraries, Richmond, Ky.  This inaugural issue features seven articles from nineteen authors.

Evans, Mari-Lynn, Holly George-Warren, and Robert Santelli, ed.  2004.  The Appalachians: America’s First and Last Frontier.  New York: Random House.  255 pp.  Profusely illustrated historical portrait in 30 brief chapters, and companion volume to three-hour PBS documentary: Part 1. The first frontier -- The land / Bill Richardson -- The landscape of the Southern Appalachians / T. Addison Richards -- Wild thing: the Joyce Kilmer Memorial Forest / Ted Olson -- The mountain melting pot: Appalachia's diverse ethnic and racial groups / Ted Olson -- Appalachia's Scots-Irish ancestry / John Trew -- The Civil War in Appalachia / Gordon B. McKinney -- Storytelling in Appalachia / Judy Prozzillo Byers -- Part 2. Feuds, coal, white lightning, and good ol' mountain music -- The Great Mountain Feud / Tom Robertson -- Appalachian myths and the legacy of coal / Ronald L. Lewis -- Moonshine on the mountain / Tom Robertson -- The Bristol sessions / Charles Wolfe -- The story of my family: the Carter family / Rita Forrester -- Falling in love with the Carters / Johnny Cash -- Part 3. Boom or bust -- A hillbilly timeline / Holly George-Warren -- Discoveries of the people: an introduction to the music of Appalachia / Paul Burch -- A West Virginia life / Robert C. Byrd -- Blue Kentucky girl / Martha Hume -- Readin', writin', and Route 21: the road from West Virginia to Ohio / David Giffels -- My West Virginia / Alan B. Mollohan -- Part 4. Memories: keeping the spirit in the modern world -- The trunk in the attic / Gary Carden -- Black Mountain breakdown / Lee Smith -- Killing our hills: the devastation of mountaintop removal / Vivian Stockman -- Fighting for my Appalachian home / Julia Bonds -- Religion in Appalachia: examples of the diversity / Howard Dorgan -- Preaching to the chickens / Gary Carden -- The Jolo Church of the Lord Jesus / Shannon Bell -- The picture man / Shelby Lee Adams -- The quare gene / Tony Earley -- Full circle / Edwin Sweeney -- The train passes through but doesn't stop / Jason Ringenberg].

Fine, Elizabeth C., ed.  1995.  Appalachia and the Politics of CultureJournal of the Appalachian Studies Association, vol. 7.  Johnson City: East Tennessee State University, Center for Appalachian Studies and Services.  162 pp.

Fisher, Steve, and Barbara Ellen Smith.  2011.  “A Reaction to ‘Action, Scholarship, Reflection, Renewal’: Forging an Unbroken Chain” [intergenerational dialogue and organizing for social justice; scholarship and activism; 1960s Appalachian Volunteers].  Journal of Appalachian Studies 17, no. 1-2 (Spring-Fall): 25-27.  Reaction to David Walls’ keynote address at 2011 annual conference of the Appalachian Studies Association.

Fletcher, Arthur Lloyd.  [1963] 2006.  Ashe County: A History, a new edition [N.C.].  Contributions to Southern Appalachian Studies, no. 14.  Jefferson, N.C.: McFarland.  431 pp.  Originally published: Ashe County Research Association.

Florin, John, and Richard Pillsbury.  2006.  “Appalachia” [concise overview of the Region].  In The New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture, Vol. 2: Geography, ed. R. Pillsbury, 42-45.  Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.

Forbes, Harold M., comp.  2007–  .  “Recent Publications.”  West Virginia History, n.s. 1.  Annual bibliography of books, articles, and theses; fall issue.

Fowler, John D.  1998.  “Appalachia’s Agony: A Historiographical Essay on Modernization and Development in the Appalachian Region.”  Filson Club Historical Quarterly 72 (July): 305-328.

Gaventa, John.  2002.  “Appalachian Studies in Global Context: Reflections on the Beginnings--Challenges for the Future” [article based on the author’s keynote address at the 25th annual meeting of the Appalachian Studies Association, Helen, Ga., March 2002; with comments on “Appalachia As a Global Region: Toward Critical Regionalism and Civic Professionalism” by Herbert Reid and Betsy Taylor, Journal of Appalachian Studies 8 (Spring 2002): 9-32].  Journal of Appalachian Studies 8 (Spring 2002): 79-90.

Griffin, Larry J., and Ashley B. Thompson.  2002.  “Appalachia and the South: Collective Memory, Identity, and Representation” [cultural politics].  Appalachian Journal 29 (Spring): 296-327.

Guerrant, Edward O. [1838-1916].  [1910] 2005.  The Galax Gatherers: The Gospel among the Highlanders [home missionaries].  Foreword by Durwood Dunn; Introduction by Mark Huddle.  Appalachian Echoes.  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.  220 pp.  Originally published: Richmond, Va.: Onward Press.

Hanlon, Tina L., and Judy A. Teaford, ed.  2000.  AppLit [award winning web site containing resources for readers and teachers of Appalachian literature: articles, authors, bibliographies, fiction & poems, lesson plans, links, study guides].  http://www.ferrum.edu/applit/.

Hay, Fred J.  2004.  “From ‘Mountain Whites’ to ‘Appalachians (People)’: A Description of the Journey, Concluding with a Brief Sermon” [changing the standard Library of Congress Subject Heading].  ANSS-L Monthly Questions and Answers: Publications and Bibliographies  (Anthropology and Sociology Section of the Association of College and Research Libraries).  http://anssacrl.wordpress.com/publications/cataloging-qa/2005-saco-process/.  See also:  http://wikis.ala.org/acrl/index.php/SACO_process.

Hay, Fred J.  2008.  “Alleghania, Appalachian America, or Appalachia: A Region (re)Discovered, (re)Defined, and Documented.”  Journal of the Society of North Carolina Archivists 6, no.1 (Summer).

Herrin, Roberta T., and Sheila Quinn Oliver, comps.  2010.  Appalachian Children’s Literature: An Annotated Bibliography [18th century to present; 2000 entries arranged by author].  Foreword by George Ella Lyon; preface [history] by Roberta Herrin, 3-11.  Contributions to Southern Appalachian Studies, no. 26.  Jefferson, N.C.: McFarland.  347 pp., including: Appendix I: Counties in Appalachia; Appendix II: Grade Levels (Authors, Titles); Author, Title, Illustrator Index; Subject Index.

Herrin, Roberta Teague.  2010.  “Studying Appalachia from Ripshin to the University: A Conversation with Roberta Herrin” [biography; b. 1949; Tenn.].  Interview by Beth Bissmeyer, Lindsey Martin, and Chad Berry.  Appalachian Journal 38, no. 1 (Fall): 20-34.  Herrin has been director of the Center for Appalachian Studies and Services (CASS) at East Tennessee State University since 2004.

Herrin, Roberta Teague.  2010.  “The High, the Low, and the In-Between.”  Now & Then: The Appalachian Magazine 26, no. 1 (Summer): 2.  Musings on our tendency to focus on dualities and extremes at the expense of the center/heart/humanness that binds – and its reflection in Appalachian experience.

Herrin, Roberta.  2006.  “The Tending To” [Center for Appalachian Studies and Services].  Now & Then: The Appalachian Magazine 22, no. 2 (Fall/Winter): 2-3.  CASS takes measure of itself as an ‘institution’ as it moves 22 years worth of files to a new space at East Tennessee State University.

Higgs, Robert J., Ambrose N. Manning, and Jim Wayne Miller, ed.  1995.  Appalachia Inside Out: A Sequel to Voices from the Hills.  Volume 1: Conflict and Change;  Volume 2: Culture and Custom. Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.  753 pp.

Higgs, Robert J., and Ambrose N. Manning, ed.  1996.  Voices from the Hills: Selected Readings of Southern Appalachia.  2nd ed.  Reprint.  Dubuque, Ia.: Kendall/Hunt.  540 pp.  Originally published: New York: Frederick Ungar; co-published with Appalachian Consortium Press, Boone, N.C., 1975.

House, Silas.  2008.  “A Conscious Heart.”  Journal of Appalachian Studies 14, no. 1-2 (Spring-Fall): 7-19.  Transcript of keynote speech at 2008 Appalachian Studies Conference.  Topics include mountaintop removal mining; citizen apathy and activism; the power of words [“language is political”]; self-image; and promoting regional pride.

Hsiung, David C.  1997. Two Worlds in the Tennessee Mountains: Exploring the Origins of Appalachian Stereotypes [winner, 1996 Appalachian Studies Award].  Lexington: University Press of Kentucky.  224 pp.

Hurt, R. Douglas.  2001.  “A Guide to Reading the Social History of the Ohio Valley, 1780-1830.”  Ohio Valley History 1, no. 2 (Spring): 29-35.  Extensive narrative bibliography on the historiography of the Ohio River Valley listing dozens of important sources.

Hutchins Library, Special Collections & Archives.  2006.  Records of the Council of the Southern Mountains: Online Exhibition [“summaries of CSM’s activism in Appalachia during the 1970s and 1980s...also a number of photos included, a timeline documenting CSM’s projects and activities, and a page including various resources”].  Berea College, Berea, Ky.  http://www.berea.edu/hutchinslibrary/specialcollections/exhibit/exhibitsaa101exhibit.asp.

Hutchins Library, Special Collections & Archives.  2006.  Guide to the Council of the Southern Mountains Records, 1970-1989  [finding aid; “collection documents changes in welfare rights, miners’ rights, mine health and safety, strip mining, and women’s rights, among other things, in the Southern Appalachian Region”].  Berea College, Berea, Ky.  http://www.berea.edu/hutchinslibrary/specialcollections/saa101.asp.

Hyde, Gene.  2008.  “Appalachian Special Collections and Appalachian Studies: The Relationship Between Collections, Curricula, and the Development of Interdisciplinary Regional Studies Programs.”  Journal of the Society of North Carolina Archivists 6, no.1 (Summer).

Inscoe, John C.  2002.  “The Discovery of Appalachia: Regional RevisionismAsScholarly Renaissance” [narrative history, reviewing several dozen standard studies].  In A Companion to the American South, ed. J. Boles, 369-386.  Blackwell Companions to American History, no. 3.  Malden, Mass.: Blackwell.

Kahn, Si.  2012.  “Organizing, Culture, and Resistance in Appalachia: Past, Present, and Future.” Journal of Appalachian Studies 18, no. 1-2 (Spring-Fall): 8-24.  Keynote address from the 2012 Appalachian Studies Association Annual Conference, Indiana, Pa., March 23, 2012.  With responses by: William H. Turner, “Si Kahn Sings to a Harlan County Choirboy,” 25-27; and Marat Moore, “The Wide Reach of Si Kahn,” 27-30.  Si Kahn has worked almost 50 years as a civil rights, union and community organizer and musician in Appalachia.

Keefe, Susan E., ed.  2005.  Appalachian Cultural Competency: A Guide for Medical, Mental Health, and Social Service Professionals.  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.  343 pp. [15 essays, expert, well-grounded: Pt. I. Preparing for work in an Appalachian community: Adopting the reflexive practitioner role / Pt. II. Acquiring cultural competency: Understanding and respecting the Appalachian “difference” / Pt. III. Transcending stereotypes in research and practice: Examples from health and wellness / Pt. IV. Choosing a theoretical paradigm: Application of the cultural model in mental health research and services].

Keefe, Susan Emley.  2001.  “Appalachian Americans: The Formation of ‘Reluctant’ Ethnics.”  Chap. 7 in  Many Americas: Critical Perspectives on Race, Racism, and Ethnicity, ed. G. Campbell, 129-153.  Dubuque, Iowa: Kendall/Hunt.  Chapter subsections: Defining the region [maps]; Racial and cultural diversity; Formation of the ethnic group; Construction of cultural “otherness”;  Appalachian culture and values [explicated]: egalitarianism, individualism and independence, personalism, avoidance of conflict, familism, religious world view, sense of place; Contemporary ethnic identity; Conclusion.

Kephart, Horace.  [1922] 2001.  Our Southern Highlanders: A Narrative of Adventure in the Southern Appalachians and a Study of Life among the Mountaineers.  Reprint of rev. ed. (Macmillan Company, 1922).  Alexander, N.C.: Land of the Sky Books.  469 pp.  Originally published: New York: Outing Pub. Co., 1913  [Note: the standard, modern reprint edition of this seminal study is Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 1976, with its Introduction by George Ellison, ix-xlvi, and his Note on Location of Kephart Materials, xlvii-xlviii].

Legnini, Jessica.  2009.  “Radicals, Reunion, and Repatriation: Harlan County and the Constraints of History.”  Register of the Kentucky Historical Society 107, no. 4 (Autumn): 471-512.  Historiography -- “an examination of the ‘historical construction’ of Harlan County,” both inside and out: “...varying perspectives of coal miners, coal companies, reformers, government and civic organizations, present-day museums, contemporary observers, and...historical markers.”

Lewis, Ronald L.  [1999] 2001.  “Beyond Isolation and Homogeneity: Diversity and the History of Appalachia.”  In Back Talk from Appalachia: Confronting Stereotypes, ed. D. Billings, G. Norman, and K. Ledford, 21-43.  Lexington: University Press of Kentucky.  Originally published as Confronting Appalachian Stereotypes.

Lewis, Ronald L., and Dwight B. Billings.  1997.  “Appalachian Culture and Economic Development: A Retrospective View on the Theory and Literature” [excerpt from “A Socioeconomic Review of Appalachia”: A Report Prepared for the Appalachian Regional Commission].  Journal of Appalachian Studies 3 (Spring): 3-42.

Ludke, Robert L., Phillip J. Obermiller, Eric W. Rademacher, and Shiloh K. Turner.  2010. “Identifying Appalachian Adults: An Empirical Study.”  Appalachian Journal 38, no. 1 (Fall): 36-45.  Identifies “several approaches to eliciting Appalachian identity.” “The question ‘Where is Appalachia?’ is subtly different from the question ‘Who is Appalachian?’.”

Macneal, Douglas.  1997.  “How Can You Call Pittsburgh Appalachian?”  Now & Then: The Appalachian Magazine 14 (Winter): 10-13.

McCann, Eugene J.  1998.  “Mapping Appalachia: Toward a Critical Understanding.”  Journal of Appalachian Studies 4 (Spring): 87-113.  “Official” maps versus grassroots, GIS-participatory mapping.

McKinney, Gordon B.  1996.  “The Future of the Appalachian Past.”  Appalachian Heritage 24 (Winter): 14-21.  Survey of contemporary scholars’ more honest assessments of the Region’s past.

Milligan, Sarah.  2012.  “Oral History in Kentucky.”  Ohio Valley History 12, no. 1 (Spring): 73-83.  Kentucky Oral History Commission (KOHC).  “For over thirty-five years, the state has been a national leader in oral history, growing strong university-centered programs as well as hundreds of grassroots projects.”

Mitchell, Alison C.  2001.  “Researching Appalachia and the WPA at the Library of Congress.”  Folklife Center News (Library of Congress) 23, no. 2 (Spring): 17-19.  http://www.loc.gov/folklife/news/index.html.

Montgomery, Michael.  1994.  “The Contributions of Joseph Sargent  Hall to Appalachian Studies.”  In Appalachian Adaptations to a Changing World, ed. Norma Myers.  Journal of the Appalachian Studies Association 6: 89-98.  Johnson City: East Tennessee State University, Center for Appalachian Studies and Services.

Morley, Margaret W.  [1913] 2006.  The Carolina Mountains [mountain life, customs, natural history, description and travel].  Fairview, N.C.: Bright Mountain Books.  358 pp.  Originally published: Boston: Houghton Mifflin.

Murray, Robert.  2008.  “Our Ditch-Digger.”  Student interview by Chelsea Forester.  Foxfire Magazine 42, special edition (Spring): 4-18.  Murray is Curator, Foxfire Museum and Heritage Center, Mountain City, Ga.

New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture, The.  2006– .  Edited by Charles Reagan Wilson, James G. Thomas Jr., and Ann J. Abadie. Sponsored by The Center for the Study of Southern Culture at the University of Mississippi. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina. (Rev. ed. of Encyclopedia of Southern Culture, 1989).  V. 1. Religion | v. 2. Geography | v. 3. History | v. 4. Myth, Manners, and Memory | v. 5. Language | v. 6. Ethnicity | v. 7. Foodways | v. 8. Environment | v. 9. Literature | v. 10. Law & Politics | v. 11. Agriculture and Industry | v. 12. Music | v. 13. Gender | v. 14. Folklife | v. 15. Urbanization |  v. 16. Sports & Recreation |  v. 17. Education |  v. 18. Media |  v. 19. Violence |  v. 20. Social Class |  v. 21. Art & Architecture |  v. 23. Science & Medicine |  v. 23. Folk Art |  v. 24. Race. |

New Georgia Encyclopedia, The.  2004. [Internet resource, continually updated.  “Articles, images, sound, and moving image material as well as links to other Web sites related to the history, culture, and life of the state”].  Athens: Georgia Humanities Council and the University of Georgia Press.  http://www.newgeorgiaencyclopedia.org/nge/Home.jsp.

Noe, Kenneth W.  2002.  “Appalachia Before Mr. Peabody: Some Recent Literature on the Southern Mountain Region” [narrative accounting of landmark studies since the 1970s].  Virginia Magazine of History and Biography 110 (no. 1): 5-34.

Northern Appalachia [W. Va., Ohio, Pa., N.Y.].  1997.  Special issue, Now & Then: The Appalachian Magazine 14 (Winter): 1-48.

Now & Then Magazine.  2003.  Now & Then: The Appalachian Magazine 20, no. 2-3 (Summer/Winter): 57-64. [20th anniversary tribute essays from past and present editors in this possibly final issue, by Nancy Fischman, Fred Waage, Pat Arnow, Laurene Scalf, Linda Parsons Marion, and Marianne Worthington; includes list of issue titles].

Obermiller, Phillip J., and Michael E. Maloney, ed.  2002.  Appalachia: Social Context Past and Present.  4th ed.  Foreword by Loyal Jones.  Dubuque, Iowa: Kendall/Hunt.  450 pp.  Textbook anthology: 39 chapters plus selected bibliographies.

Obermiller, Phillip J., and Michael E. Maloney, ed.  2007.  Appalachia: Social Context Past and Present.  5th ed.  Dubuque, Iowa: Kendall/Hunt.  416 pp.  Standard textbook with 37 authoritative essays arranged under the following headings: I. What Is Appalachia?  II. Appalachian Diversity.  III. Migration and Urbanization.  IV. Appalachian Stereotypes.  V. The New Appalachian Culture.  VI. Health and the Environment.  VII. The Political Economy of Appalachia.  VIII. Policy Issues.  IX. Resistance and Community Organizing.  X. References.  XI. Appalachian Studies Bibliography.  XII. Selected Films.  XIII. Selected Websites.

Ohio Historical Society.  2005.  Ohio History Central: An Online Encyclopedia of Ohio History [indexed by location (Southeast Ohio), topic, media, time period, category].  Columbus: Ohio Historical Society, begun 1998, updated regularly.  http://www.ohiohistorycentral.org/ohc/.

Olson, Ted, comp. and ed.  2011.  “Future of Appalachian Studies: A Roundtable.”  Journal of Appalachian Studies 17, no. 1-2 (Spring-Fall): 188-213.  Response #1: Appalachian Studies is not like other disciplines / Patricia Beaver -- Response #2: Appalachian Studies 2.0 / Chad Berry -- Response #3: Place matters / Dwight B. Billings -- Response #4: Cultural hermeneutics and the current crises / Rodger Cunningham -- Response #5: Greening Appalachian Studies: sustainable development / Donald E. Davis -- Response #6: Planting by signs / Jean Haskell -- Response #7: Can the region survive? / Helen Matthews Lewis -- Response #8: Thinking outside the ball / Phillip J. Obermiller -- Response #9: Roundtable: the future of Appalachian Studies / Douglas Reichert Powell.

Olson, Ted, comp. and ed.  2010.  “Native and Fine and Enduring: A Roundtable on David Whisnant’s All That Is Native and Fine” [All That Is Native & Fine: The Politics of Culture in an American Region, University of North Carolina Press, 1983, 2009].  Journal of Appalachian Studies 16, no. 1-2 (Spring-Fall): 101-121.  Response #1: Understanding the politics of culture / Maureen Mullinax -- Response #2: The end of an era of innocence / Burt Feintuch -- Response #3: A book that makes sense of it all / Michael Ann Williams -- Response #4: All that is native and fine and the politics of tradition / Jane Becker -- Response #5: All That Is Native and Fine: staying power / Anthony Harkins -- Response #6: I’ve endured: the legacy of culture workers in Maryland / Clifford Murphy -- Response #7: The messy and complex politics of cultural intervention / Amanda Fickey -- Response [to the above responders]: A work of many hands: notes on reading about my book / David Whisnant.

Oxendine, Jill.  2006.  “On Creating an Encyclopedia of Appalachia” [managing editor; Encyclopedia of Appalachia, University of Tennessee Press, 2006].  Now & Then: The Appalachian Magazine 22, no. 1 (Spring): 43-45.

Perkins, Alfred.  1995.  “John Stephenson and the College of Appalachia: A Chronicle and a Tribute.”  Appalachian Heritage 23 (Spring): 19-23.

Powell, William Stevens, and Jay Mazzocchi, ed.  2006.  Encyclopedia of North Carolina [2000 entries by 550 contributors, 400 illustrations].  Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.  1314 pp.

Pudup, Mary Beth, Dwight B. Billings, and Altina L. Waller, ed.  1995.  Appalachia in the Making: The Mountain South in the Nineteenth Century.  Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.  391 pp.  Fourteen essays: by Mary K. Anglin, Alan Banks, Dwight B. Billings, Kathleen M. Blee, Wilma A. Dunaway, John R. Finger, John C. Inscoe, Ronald L. Lewis, Ralph Mann, Gordon B. McKinney, Mary Beth Pudup, Paul Salstrom, Altina L. Waller, and John Alexander Williams.

Raine, James Watt.  [1924, 1969] 1997.  The Land of Saddle-Bags: A Study of the Mountain People of Appalachia.  Foreword by Dwight Billings, ix-xliv.  Reprint.  Lexington: University Press of Kentucky.  260 pp.

Rehder, John B.  2004.  Appalachian Folkways [cultural milieu; chapters cover public image, geography, ethnicity, architecture, jobs, foodways, folk remedies, music, art, festivals, and speech].  Creating the North American Landscape.  Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press.  353 pp.

Reid, Herbert, and Betsy Taylor.  2002.  “Appalachia As a Global Region: Toward Critical Regionalism and Civic Professionalism” [globalization, identity, and the role of Appalachian Studies].  Journal of Appalachian Studies 8 (Spring): 9-32.

Reid, Herbert G.  1996.  “Global Adjustments, Throwaway Regions, Appalachian Studies: Resituating The Kentucky Cycle on the Postmodern Frontier.”  Journal of Appalachian Studies 2 (Fall): 235-262.

Reid, Herbert G.  2005.  “Appalachia and the ‘Sacrament of Co-existence’: Beyond Post-colonial Trauma and Regional Identity Traps” [overview and reflections on Appalachia on Our Mind: The Southern Mountains and Mountaineers in the American Consciousness, 1870-1920, by Henry D. Shapiro (University of North Carolina Press, 1978)].  Journal of Appalachian Studies 11, no. 1-2 (Spring-Fall): 164-181.

Remembering John B. Stephenson.  1995.  Special Commemorative Section.  Appalachian Heritage 23 (Winter): 3-26.

Riddel, Frank S.  2008.  Historical Atlas of West Virginia.  Morgantown: West Virginia University Press.  306 pp.  127 maps and eight sections: Geography; History; Evolution of Counties; Development of Transportation; Natural Resources and Extractive Industries; Education; Population; and Legislative, Judicial, and Congressional Districts.

Salstrom, Paul.  1995.  “Newer Appalachia as One of America’s Last Frontiers.”  In Appalachia in the Making: The Mountain South in the Nineteenth Century, ed. M. Pudup, D. Billings, and A. Waller, 76-102.  Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.

Sanders, Randy.  2007.  “We ‘Dig’ Appalachia.”  Now & Then: The Appalachian Magazine 23, no. 1 (Spring/Summer): 44-48.  Responses to the question, “What does it mean to you to be an Appalachian,” by Rebecca Anderson, Anne Pope, and Mark Musick.

Sather, Nancy.  1999.  “Appalachian Heritage: A Celebration of the Vernacular” [overview and accolade for this regional literary journal].  Appalachian Heritage 27 (Summer): 7-8.

Sawyer, David.  1995.  “Bodhisattva in Berea: John Stephenson and the Tibetans.”  Appalachian Heritage 23 (Spring): 16-18.

Scott, Shaunna L.  1995.  “Teaching for Democracy: Reflections on Teaching Appalachian Studies.”  In Appalachia and the Politics of Culture, ed. E. C. Fine.  Journal of the Appalachian Studies Association 7: 131-139.  Johnson City: East Tennessee State University, Center for Appalachian Studies and Services.

Scott, Shaunna L.  2001.  “Civics Lessons from Another Place: A Case Study of the Northern Ireland Women’s Festival Day Project.”  Journal of Appalachian Studies 7 (Fall): 187-225.

Scott, Shaunna L.  2009.  “Discovering What the People Knew: The 1979 Appalachian Land Ownership Study.”  Action Research 7, no. 2 (June): 185-205.  Landmark community-based study of land ownership and taxation.

Scott, Shaunna.  2008.  “The Appalachian Land Ownership Study Revisited” [taxation; corporate and absentee ownership; Ky., W. Va., Tenn., Va., N.C., Ala.; county outline map].  Appalachian Journal 35, no. 3 (Spring): 236-252.  Goals not met after 25 years from 1979-83 landmark study, Who Owns Appalachia?: Land Ownership and Its Impact (University Press of Kentucky, 1983).

Shapiro, Henry D.  1996.  Review essay of Appalachia in the Making: The Mountain South in the Nineteenth Century (ed. M. Pudup, D. Billings, and A. Waller, University of North Carolina Press, 1995).  Appalachian Journal 24 (Fall): 81-91.

Shapiro, Henry D.  2005.  “How Region Changed Its Meaning and Appalachia Changed Its Standing in the Twentieth Century” [1990s: regionalism, pluralism, exploitation, and stereotyping].  In Bridging Southern Cultures: An Interdisciplinary Approach, ed. J. Lowe, 265-287.  Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press.

Smith, Barbara Ellen, et al.  2010.  “Appalachian Identity: A Roundtable Discussion.”  Appalachian Journal 38, no. 1 (Fall): 56-77.  Introduction / Barbara Ellen Smith – Claiming Appalachia--and the questions that go with it / Steve Fisher – Thoughts on the importance of identifying Appalachians / Phillip J. Obermiller – Appalachian regionalism: corollaries to Sheldon Kopp’s eschatological laundry list* / David E. Whisnant – Objecting to insider/outsider politics and the uncritical celebration of Appalachia / Emily Satterwhite – Reflections on identity and the roots of prejudice / Roger Cunningham – Works cited in Appalachian identity roundtable discussion [32 references].

Smith, Barbara Ellen, Steve Fisher, Emily Satterwhite, and Phillip Obermiller.  2012.  Letters to the Editor [four], in response to Tal Stanley’s reflections (38, no. 4: 356-361) on their “Roundtable on Regional Identity” (38, no. 1: 56-77).  Appalachian Journal 39, no. 1-2 (Fall 2011/Winter 2012): 28-34.

Smith, Barbara Ellen.  2002.  “The Place of Appalachia” [political identity; globalization]. Journal of Appalachian Studies 8 (Spring): 42-49.

Smithfield Review: Studies in the History of the Region West of the Blue Ridge [published annually in May].  Vol. 1—  .  1997—  .  Published by the Montgomery County Branch Association for the Preservation of Virginia Antiquities; in conjunction with Pocahontas Press, Inc., Blacksburg, Va.

Snyder, Bob.  1995.  “The Appalachian Band in the Moral Spectrum.”  Appalachian Journal 22 (Spring): 250-261.

Stanley, Tal.  2011.  “On Appalachian Identity” [op-ed essay].  Appalachian Journal 38, no. 4 (Summer): 356-361.  An appreciation and reflection on the 2010 Roundtable Discussion on Appalachian Identity (Appalachian Journal 38, no. 1 (Fall): 56-77), with Barbara Ellen Smith, Steve Fisher, Phillip Obermiller, David Whisnant, Emily Satterwhite, and Roger Cunningham.

Straw, Richard A., and H. Tyler Blethen, ed.  2004.  High Mountains Rising: Appalachia in Time and Place.  Urbana: University of Illinois Press.  240 pp.  Fourteen essays; primer on history and culture by leading scholars.

Straw, Richard.  2006.  “Appalachian History” [1700s to 1970s; with suggested readings].  In A Handbook to Appalachia: An Introduction to the Region, ed. G. Edwards, J. Asbury, and R. Cox, 1-26.  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.

Sullivan, Ken.  2006.  The West Virginia Encyclopedia [2200 articles by 600 writers; numerous photographs; appendices include biographical directory of contributors, and list of W. Va. species].  Charleston: West Virginia Humanities Council.  927 pp.

Sullivan, Ken.  2008.  “Making Book: The Encyclopedia of Appalachia Takes Its Place in a Crowded Field” [University of Tennessee Press, 2006; review essay].  West Virginia History, n.s. 2, no. 1 (Spring): 91-98.

Tenkotte, Paul A., and James C. Claypool, ed.  2009.  The Encyclopedia of Northern Kentucky [2000 entries].  Lexington: University Press of Kentucky.  1047 pp.  Eleven-county area bounded by Appalachian counties on one side and the Ohio River on the other.

Tennessee Electronic Atlas (TEA).  2002.  Dir. Bruce A. Ralston.  Housed at Knoxville: Department of Geography, University of Tennessee.  http://tnatlas.geog.utk.edu/tea/tea.asp.

Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture, The [free online edition; 1500 entries].  2002.  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.  Text copyright 1998 by The Tennessee Historical Society, Nashville.  http://tennesseeencyclopedia.net.

Thompson, Deborah, and Irene Moser.  2006.  “Appalachian Folklife” [lore, food, crafts, music, dance, storytelling; with suggested readings].  In A Handbook to Appalachia: An Introduction to the Region, ed. G. Edwards, J. Asbury, and R. Cox, 143-162.  Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.

Tucker, Bruce.  2002.  Review essay on four books: Dwight B. Billings and Kathleen Blee, The Road to Poverty: The Making of Wealth and Hardship in Appalachia (2000);  Jane Becker, Selling Tradition: Appalachia and the Construction of an American Folk, 1930-1940 (1998); Dwight B. Billings, Gurney Norman, and Katherine Ledford, ed., Back Talk from Appalachia: Confronting Stereotypes (1999); Chad Berry, Southern Migrants, Northern Exiles (2000).  Canadian Review of American Studies 32, no. 3: 321-332.

Tucker, Bruce.  2003.  “Harry Caudill and the Problem of the Past.”  Rethinking Appalachian Studies Series.  Journal of Appalachian Studies 9 (Spring): 114-146.

Wallenstein, Peter.  2000.  “The Grinch That Stole Southern History: Anthem for an Appalachian Perspective.”  Smithfield Review: Studies in the History of the Region West of the Blue Ridge 4: 67-81.  “...frames an alternative way of viewing the history of the South....Arguing that much of southern history can best be understood as a three-cornered struggle among blackbelt whites, blackbelt blacks, and the people of Appalachia, the author argues against what he calls a ‘plantation approach to southern history” (the ‘Grinch’ of the essay’s title).”

Walls, David.  2011.  “Action, Scholarship, Reflection, Renewal” [plenary session].  Journal of Appalachian Studies 17, no. 1-2 (Spring-Fall): 9-25.  With Responses by Sarah Riley (15-20), and Jason Howard (20-23).  Plus, “A Reaction to ‘Action, Scholarship, Reflection, Renewal’: Forging an Unbroken Chain,” by Steve Fisher and Barbara Ellen Smith (25-27).  Keynote address at annual conference of the Appalachian Studies Association, Richmond, Ky., March 11, 2011, by the last director of the Appalachian Volunteers.  Discusses the 1976 symposium in Boone, N.C. in honor of Cratis Williams that led to the founding of the Appalachian Studies Conference.

West, Carroll Van, ed.  1998.  Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture [1500 entries; 29 major essays; index].  Nashville: Tennessee Historical Society.  1193 pp.

Whaley, Abe.  2007.  “Digging Appalachia: Cycles of Interest from Beyond Our Borders” [national attention].  Now & Then: The Appalachian Magazine 23, no. 1 (Spring/Summer): 49-53.

Williams, Elizabeth M.  2009.  “ John C. Campbell and the Social Survey.”  In CrossRoads: A Southern Culture Annual, 2009, ed. Ted Olson and Ajay Kalra, 249-270.  Macon, Ga.: Mercer University Press.  Survey of Southern Appalachia conducted for the Russell Sage Foundation.  Campbell is author of the seminal work, The Southern Highlander and His Homeland (1921).

Williams, John Alexander.  1993.  “Appalachia” [with maps, bibliography].  In Encyclopedia of American Social History, Vol. 3, ed. M. Cayton, et al., 1031-1044.  New York: Scribner.

Williams, John Alexander.  1996.  “Appalachia.”  In American Folklore: An Encyclopedia, ed. J. H. Brunvand, 35-38.  Garland Reference Library of the Humanities, vol. 1551.  New York: Garland.

Williams, John Alexander.  1996.  “Counting Yesterday’s People: Using Aggregate Data To Address the Problem of Appalachia's Boundaries.”  Journal of Appalachian Studies 2 (Spring): 3-27.

Williams, John Alexander.  [1976] 2001.  West Virginia: A History.  2nd ed.  Morgantown: West Virginia University Press.  220 pp.  Originally published by W.W. Norton as West Virginia: A Bicentennial History.

Williams, John Alexander.  2001.  “Appalachian History: Regional History in the Post-Modern Zone” [adapted from the introduction to Appalachia: A History (2002)].  Appalachian Journal 28 (Winter): 168-187.

Williams, John Alexander.  2002.  Appalachia: A History [Weatherford Award winner].  Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.  496 pp.